a space to grow

.

as we make way

accumulating and assimilating

it is often hard to fully appreciate

what and who and where we have become

. 

so as we grow

together

it is in everyone’s interest

to allow some space to grow apart

 .

like the water and air around us

a breathing space

some elbow room

to stretch and flex

to test our boundaries

to assess our newly found wisdom

our freedoms and limitations

our sensory shell

 .

like a root in the earth

following the worm’s way

or a branch reaching for the sun

we must each find our own path to grow and share and heal

.

blue sheep, harting hill, west sussex (p ward 2013)blue sheep, harting hill, west sussex (p ward 2013)

harting hill, west sussex (p ward 2013)harting hill, west sussex (p ward 2013)

from harting hill, west sussex (p ward 2013)from harting hill, west sussex (p ward 2013)

chalk woodland, harting hill and jew’s ear fungus, kingley vale, west sussex (p ward 2013)chalk woodland, harting hill and jew’s ear fungus, kingley vale, west sussex (p ward 2013)

kingley vale, west sussex (p ward 2013)kingley vale, west sussex (p ward 2013)

ancient yew, kingley vale, west sussex 1 (p ward 2013)ancient yew, kingley vale, west sussex 1 (p ward 2013)

ancient yew, kingley vale, west sussex 2 (p ward 2013)ancient yew, kingley vale, west sussex 2 (p ward 2013)

soil balls, kingley vale, west sussex and the sands, surrey (p ward 2013)soil balls, kingley vale, west sussex and the sands, surrey (p ward 2013)

The photographs above were taken on a midwinter visit to some youthful haunts on the South Downs in southern England. It was brilliant to see and feel the difference of light and rolling ambience of chalk bedrock and sandy Surrey soils in contrast to my local wet culm grassland and beaches of northern Devon. Harting Hill, on the newly attributed South Downs National Park, exhibits a rueful example of soils degraded by overgrazing despite the obvious rural beauty of the area, while Kingley Vale, nestled in the dip slopes of the Downs near Chichester, has some of the oldest living yew trees in the United Kingdom estimated at about 2000 years old. It is utterly awe inspiring to share space and time with such incredibly ancient beings.

© P Ward 2014

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