Crow Point 10415

“If you lack the materials to work with, go to the beach and draw with a stick in the sand, draw on the dry earth with a line of piss, make a drawing of the song of the birds in the emptiness of space, the noise of the water and of the wheel of a cart, and the song of the insects. All of this may be swept away by the wind and the water, but have the conviction that all these pure realizations of my spirit will influence, by magic and miracle, the spirit of other men.” Joan Miro, 1940

crow point © p ward 2015crow point © p ward 2015

Sometimes, when one’s creativity seems a little stifled or this art becomes a little too serious and responsibilities just too onerous to bare, it is enough to take oneself to the local beach, or a place of personal power, some woods or favourite walk, or even somewhere completely new, and just set to playing – exploring some different materials in a different environment, away from the studio with no pressure of outcome, finance or foe. Francesca and I are presently working together towards a number of exhibitions and open studios but often struggling with the demands of parenthood to find time to apply ourselves fully to our artistic endeavours. It was time for a change – a change in our expectations of ourselves, of our working practice both individually, and with each other, and maybe even a change in the form of our expression. Working together may often help such a process of re-evaluation and movement but it may just as easily hinder it. Whatever, it is always worth trying to get the juices flowing again, to unblock, to break the dam, to release and revive the mojo, so to speak.

Here’s what happened when we went to one of our favourite spots in North Devon – Crow Point, at the mouth of the Taw and Torridge rivers, where the rich estuarine waters flow into Barnstaple/Bideford Bay (wherever your more clandestine loyalties may lie), at the southern end of Braunton Burrows, centre of the UNESCO North Devon Biosphere Reserve, a place I had spent many happy childhood holiday times and one I will be continuing to share with our son Noah now and in the future.

arbritary transect © f owen & p ward 2015arbritary transect © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Transect – collecting objects that appeal from a line down the beach, recognizing arbitrary zones, changes in surface and ecology, bringing those things together as a simple expression of that system, process and place.

noah’s ark within arm’s reach © f owen & p ward 2015noah’s ark within arm’s reach © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Noah’s Ark at arm’s length – sitting and sorting the stones and sand to find as many seashells as one can within arm’s reach; drawing a line to mark that reach; placing all the shells together on a piece of rock or driftwood within the space; observing, perhaps identifying and counting and enjoying the diversity of life therein.

boardwalk for lizards and beetles © f owen & p ward 2015boardwalk for lizards and beetles © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Driftwood boardwalk for lizards and beetles – arranging a selection of sticks from one place to another.

crow point bundle © f owen & p ward 2015crow point bundle © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Flotsam and jetsam beach bundle – collect interesting things and tie them together in a bundle; photograph arrangement from a weird/artistic angle to capture a sense of moment and place.

rubbish sculpture © f owen & p ward 2015rubbish sculpture © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Rubbish sculpture, an ode to Mr Duchamp – a carefully juxtaposed re-appropriation of discarded toilet seat and plastic, sticks, rope, sand and shadows.

4 subtle stick crosses © f owen & p ward 20154 subtle stick crosses © f owen & p ward 2015

  • 4 subtle stick crosses on driftwood with sand – most transient darling!?

buggy tracks © p ward 2015buggy tracks © p ward 2015

line in the sand © f owen & p ward 2015line in the sand © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Line in the sand – drag a stick in the sand as you walk along the beach, enjoying this simple expression of movement and mark making.

crow point sketch © f owen & p ward 2015crow point sketch © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Pick things up and take them home – gather some more objects that particularly appeal to one’s artistic sensibilities at the time, tie them all together and cart them back to the car and consequently the studio where they may be arranged in pleasing and/or meaningful ways in the name of art…

As utterly committed contemporary (environmental) artists we, of course, spent time recording and documenting our ‘play’ for who knows just when our lighthearted, seemingly trivial investigative dalliances may trigger a new burst in creative output or inspired artistic flare and productivity. We also had a great time and hope that Noah did too!? From his shoulder-top vantage point who knows what he thought or what affects we may be catalyzing in his innocent and vulnerable being but from his smiling cheeky face chirruping away throughout the windy, sun filled walk, and the way he is chewing away on the table edge as I write this blog, I’m sure he’ll be just fine.

finger painting, earth pigments and natural binders on canvas © f owen & p ward 2015finger painting, earth pigments and natural binders on canvas © f owen & p ward 2015*

Thank you to Francesca and Noah for such a lovely walk, to Crow Point and North Devon in general for providing such creative and spiritual inspiration in abundance and such a beautiful place to bring up a small child, to this blog post for mainfesting yet another excuse to use one of my favourite quotes and to Mr Miro for writing it. We are now cracking back on with work in the studio in preparation to entertain and inspire you all again throughout the coming months and years…

© P Ward 2015

* and many thanks to Clare Thomas for priming the canvas with rabbit skin glue and linseed oil, and indeed for her inspiring residency at eARTh – I, for one, will be using more natural ingredients in my paint making from now on 🙂

 

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6 Comments on “Crow Point 10415”

  1. Clare Thomas says:

    Lovely. I wonder, what if you didn’t record any of your work on the beach? Do we need a permanent record for the work to be valid?

  2. Celia Wilson says:

    Thanks for this – I thought I’d print it off, so it will be in my workbook to remind me what I should be doing!

  3. Celia Wilson says:

    If that’s OK with you… :-))

  4. I enjoy working this way too…it’s extremely liberating.


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