is an artist’s worst fear selling their work?

sense to non-sense: new paintings 2017

A friend was recently horrified when her painting sold at a gallery before she could “say goodbye to it”!? Of course, she was pleased that someone (a complete stranger) liked her work and could see themselves enjoying it for a while to come (enough to pay a decent amount of money for it) but the fact that we become attached to our creations is hard to deny. We may often feel that our work isn’t finished or good enough, and even wonder why anyone else would see any value or sense in what we do. But is this simply a manifestation of our own lack of self worth or the influence of the present societal disregard for the value of art and culture to our spiritual wellbeing? Fortunately I seem to not suffer too much from any of the above ‘ailments’ and cannot rightly understand why my works of pure creative genius and beauty are not snapped up the minute they leave the easel??!! I am more often overwhelmed with wonder at the shear scope, skill and diversity shown in my humble paintings and offered at such a reasonable price too!

Anyway, here is a selection of my latest work for exhibitions I will be participating in over the next few months and years…

revisiting dreams I (earth pigments and gum arabic on paper) © p ward 2015

revisiting dreams II (earth pigments and gum arabic on paper) © p ward 2015

offcuts in an offcut frame vii – looking out to sea (earth pigments on wood) © p ward 2017

i am not alone (earth pigments on driftwood board) © p ward 2017offcuts in an offcut frame viii – quite small (earth pigments on wood) © p ward 2017

berrynarbor preschool mural (north devon earth pigments on board) © eARTh 2017

drawing on obscurity II – yoga (north devon earth pigments on board) © peter ward 2017drawing on obscurity III – fox running (north devon earth pigments on board) © peter ward 2017drawing on obscurity IV – recline (north devon earth pigments on board) © peter ward 2017drawing on obscurity V – the light over lundy (north devon earth pigments on board) © p ward 2017drawing on obscurity VI – i close my eyes (north devon earth pigments on board) © peter ward 2017drawing on obscurity VII – moorland (north devon earth pigments on board) © peter ward 2017drawing on obscurity VIII – marrakech (north devon earth pigments on board) © peter ward 2017drawing on obscurity IX – a conversation between flowers (north devon earth pigments on board) © peter ward 2017sequential II (earth pigments on canvas) © p ward 2017jump! (earth pigments on canvas) © p ward 2017offcuts in an offcut frame – displacement (earth pigments on wood) © p ward 2017drawing on obscurity X – race (north devon earth pigments on board) © peter ward 2017The work on show at eARTh studio during Ilfracombe Art Trail 2017 © eARTh 2017

Peter Doig: “We don’t always have to know what our painting is about”[i]

A recent visitor to our studio asked me to explain my work. I said I didn’t actually know what I was doing. That there was no particular symbolism invloved! I am not telling stories. Simply making marks with and on the materials I use. (She was horrified and went on to tell how she only liked pictures of horses!!??) However, I am interested in making things with the materials I gather – natural materials or things we might otherwise throw away – learning about them and how we can put different things together through making. I enjoy nature, history, geology. I like not knowing how a work may turn out. I am inspired by the results and where they may lead me next.

May they fill you with awe and wonder too :-)…

© Peter Ward 2017


[i] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/peter-doig-we-dont-always-have-to-know-what-our-painting_us_58e4b461e4b09deecf0e1bd0?ncid=engmodushpmg00000004


of this eARTh: childish inspiration and other stories

new paintings from 2016

Since the birth of our daughter Agnes in July last year, and our son Noah nearly 3 years ago, it has been rather slow getting the painty wheels turning but work has been done and exhibited and new artistic thoughts and inspiration are gradually emerging from the baby-addled-brain. Most recently I have been really enjoying Noah’s freestyle scribbling as he explores manipulation of simple mark-making tools, finding a similarity between that and my own evolving physically energetic relationship and understanding of the primitive materials that are earth pigments.

In January I was invited to give a presentation and workshop at THE ART STUDENTS CONVENTION 2107[i] at Plymouth College of Art, part of a TATE initiative[ii] to look at creative education in the UK, providing a most enjoyable personal (and paid) opportunity to look back over my development as an artist and painter, its highs and lows, and to share some thoughts with others – always a worthwhile exercise and bringing a sense of confidence and satisfaction at what I have achieved over the years.

Anyway, here is a selection of new small paintings from the last year and a quote that offers renewed meaning to my work with rocks and geology…

drawing-on-obscurity-32x35cm-earth-pigments-on-board-p-ward-2016drawing on obscurity (32x35cm; earth pigments on board) © p ward 2016

“Those who suspected Hawkes of solipsism were guilty of misreading: she in fact offers an account of selfhood in which, molecularly and emotionally, ‘every being is united both inwardly and outwardly with the beginning of life in time and with the simplest forms of contemporary life’. The ‘individual’ (from the Latin individuus, meaning ‘indivisible’) is not unique but soluble, particulate, fluid. Her book is dedicated to proving that ‘inside this the whole history of life’; she is merely one of the outcrops or features of the ‘land’. ‘Consciousness must surely be traced back to the rocks,’ she argues. A Land should be read, she suggests at its close, as ‘the simple reaction of a consciousness exposed at a particular point in time and space. I display its arguments, its posturings, as imprints of a moment of being as specific and as limited as the imprint of its body left by a herring in Cretaceous slime’. Her book is itself a geological formation, no more or less extraordinary than a fossil or a pebble.

To Hawkes, stone did not only prompt thought – it constituted it. Our ‘affinity with rock’ was so profound that she understood us to be mineral-memoried, stone sensed. Often in A Land she writes geologically of the mind’s structures: thoughts are ‘rocks . . . silently forming’, memory is ‘the Blue Lias’ of fossil-filled strata around Lyme Regis. She admires Henry Moore because while ‘Rodin pursued the idea of conscious, spiritual man emerging from the rock’, ‘Moore sees him rather as always part of it’…”

Robert Macfarlane writing in Landmarks (2015) of Jacquetta Hawkes’s book A Land (1951).

inward-boundless-i-ii-ii-iv-20x20cm-earth-pigments-on-canvas-p-ward-2016inward boundless I, II, II, IV (20x20cm; earth pigments on canvas) © p ward 2016

childish-inspiration-i-ii-iii-20x20cm-earth-pigments-on-canvas-p-ward-2016childish inspiration I, II, III (20x20cm; earth pigments on canvas) © p ward 2016

sequential-40x40cm-earth-pigments-on-canvas-p-ward-2016sequential (40x40cm; earth pigments on canvas) © p ward 2016

© P Ward 2017

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[i] http://tasc2017.co.uk

[ii] http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/workshop/tate-exchange/making-learning


please accept my resignation 131016

 

some things I have seen, done and made that have made me think, feel and smile over the last few months…

“Reading true literature [Nan Shepherd] reflected, ‘it’s as though you are standing experiencing and suddenly the work is there, bursting out of its own ripeness . . . life has exploded, sticky and rich and smelling oh so good. And . . . that makes the ordinary world magical – that reverberates/illuminates.’ ” taken from Landmarks by Robert Macfarlane.

folded-paper-little-family-special-gifts-friendship-earth-pigments-on-canvas-p-ward-2016folded paper; little family; special gifts; friendship (earth pigments on canvas) © p ward 2016

wooden-tray-full-of-found-things-earth-2016wooden tray full of found things © eARTh 2016

the-exmoor-best-exmoor-zoological-gardens-p-ward-2016‘the exmoor beast’!?, exmoor zoological gardens © p ward 2016

crow-point-p-ward-2016crow point © p ward 2016

sycamore-p-ward-2016sycamore © p ward 2016

drawing-a-line-coast-to-coast-with-skedge-13916-earth-2016drawing a line, coast to coast with skedge 13916 © eARTh 2016

learning-to-draw-i-p-ward-2016learning to draw I © p ward 2016

learning-to-draw-ii-iii-iv-earth-2016learning to draw II, III, IV © eARTh 2016

towan-beach-roseland-peninsula-bottallack-mines-st-just-cornwall-p-ward-2016towan beach, roseland peninsula; bottallack mines, st just, cornwall © p ward 2016

west-somerset-railway-bicclescombe-park-shed-ilfracombe-earth-2016west somerset railway; bicclescombe park shed, ilfracombe © eARTh 2016

painted-palette-earth-pigments-on-wood-earth-2016painted palette (earth pigments on wood) © eARTh 2016

offcuts-in-an-offcut-frame-palette-mask-earth-pigments-on-wood-p-ward-2016offcuts in an offcut frame – palette; mask (earth pigments on wood) © p ward 2016

figure-offcuts-in-an-offcut-frame-viii-earth-pigments-on-wood-building-blocks-p-ward-2016figure; offcuts in an offcut frame – VIII (earth pigments on wood); building blocks © p ward 2016

resignation-definitiondefinition from google search

with special thanks to francesca, noah, agnes, family and friends for your love, support and companionship 🙂

© p ward/eARTh 2016


offcuts in an offcut frame – new work 6616

My latest work combines using leftover bits of wood, a love of simple woodworking and an interest in the more everyday applications of paint. While, as artists, it is easy to focus on painting as an intellectually aesthetic discipline or as a means to test and enjoy our powers of observation, manipulation of materials and hand-eye coordination the majority of paints and pigments have been, and still are, used for decorating and protecting surfaces around the house and industrially.

small lengths of timber, wood and earth pigments © p ward 2016 (sold)small lengths of timber, wood and earth pigments © p ward 2016 (sold)

sediment, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016sediment, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016

offcuts in an offcut frame I, earth pigments and household gloss on wood © p ward 2016offcuts in an offcut frame I, earth pigments and household gloss on wood © p ward 2016

offcuts in an offcut frame II, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016 (sold)offcuts in an offcut frame II, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016 (sold)

For example, Bideford Black, a North Devon pigment that I have spent time researching[i], was used primarily in the shipbuilding industry as an anti-foul, as a household paint (Zats Black), to paint tank camouflage in WWII, for dyeing rubber and cement and even for making mascara, but I am yet to find evidence of it being commercially processed as an artist’s pigment. Despite recent local and national artistic interest it is, in my experience, a rather gritty, difficult and dull black material that is prone to sapping the life out of all the other colours it comes close to. So while Reeves of London may have considered another North Devon pigment, Berrynarbour Umber, ‘essential for any paint box’ I cannot see Leonardo sending for some Bideford Black (as he may have for yellow from Naples or green from Verona)! But then it has its very own nature and one that as artists and/or paint makers we can choose to embrace or at least take into account if using it.

offcuts in an offcut frame III, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016offcuts in an offcut frame III, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016

Every pigment I have used has its own quality and spirit, and recognizing and working with this understanding is one of the primary and most exciting lessons I have learnt from gathering and processing pigments. They are all an expression of a place, of a geological process and may carry with them a provenance rooted in nature and social history, as well as qualities that lend themselves to one purpose or another. Similarly, while the colours I often use for display and educational purposes are quite bold (to impress and surprise people with the richness of colour under our feet) the subtlety and range of colours of soils, clays and rocks associated with any site is utterly sublime. This may often be seen when studying the colours of materials and paints used in architecture from region to region and the sense of place this inspires.

displacement, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016displacement, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016

Another area of interest to me, through my alter ego as a painter and decorator, has been the fashion (albeit necessary) for ‘environmentally friendly’ household paint. While industry searches for new products to replace traditionally oil-based paints we are happy to accept (inferior) low-odour acrylic substitutes. I am not sure exactly how household paints are manufactured or what they are made from but do know that acrylics have an equally dubious environmental impact.

four sails, earth pigments on wood and canvas in re-used frame © p ward 2016four sails, earth pigments on wood and canvas in re-used frame © p ward 2016

offcut in an offcut frame, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016offcut in an offcut frame, earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016

From my experience, traditional oil based paints work – they stay on the surface for a good while whereas contemporary substitutes tend to scratch off easily and attract dirt more readily, sometimes removing more of the paint when wiped! To my knowledge oil based paints have been made using plant resins and oils and cleaned and thinned with turpentine – another plant based product. The issue of pollution often occurs in production, cleaning brushes, in disposal and from fumes given off when applying. Whereas modern ‘plastic’ paints, while addressing many of the H&S issues of traditional paints, may stop plaster and stone from ‘breathing’ causing problems with damp and water retention[ii]. This is not to say that there is nothing wrong with good old traditional paint – that we should just ‘get a grip’ over a bit of casual solvent abuse and some dead fish – but that there is obviously still a lot of work to be done to reach a satisfactory conclusion both in terms of environmental impact, health and safety, and durability.

Maybe it is more our attitudes towards and understanding of such matters that need addressing!? Whatever, every circumstance and application is individual as are the solutions…

offcuts in an offcut frame IV (wabi sabi), earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016offcuts in an offcut frame IV (wabi sabi), earth pigments on wood © p ward 2016

Rants and ramblings aside, it has been fascinating cobbling together old bits and pieces of wood to make new surfaces to paint on and seeing how the hand made paint works with the different surfaces. The pieces have taken on a more sculptural feel, playing the illusional 3D qualities achieved by painting off against the shallow relief of the structured surface. Thankfully some of the pieces have already been sold, the buyer commenting on the ‘Wabi Sabi’ quality of the work – a Japanese world view centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection[iii], the principle of repair, making new from old, celebrating the beauty of decay and repurpose. While this was not necessarily my intention, I do like the association.

© P Ward 2016

(Note: Apologies for the slightly distorted imagery – the frames are actually square. I have temporarily lost use of my photo editing programme due to a systems upgrade. If anyone knows of a good free photo editing suite that allows you to rotate by degrees and adjust camera distortion, please let me know :-))

_____________________________________________

[i] http://bidefordblack.blogspot.co.uk/p/whats-it-all-about.html

[ii] However, to the contrary, we have recently been experimenting with organic binders, such as rabbit skin glue and gum Arabic, and found that in certain environmental conditions, such as damp and cold, or through errors in preparation, they are prone to rapid disintegration – to mould and flaking. A factor not conducive to good business practice in the production and commercial distribution of fine objets d’art!

[iii] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi


back to basics

5 small earth paintings

Beaten by both the need for storage space for my work and, hopefully, a more commercially viable product I have resorted, and returned, to making a number of small earth pigment paintings on paper.

Originally I wanted to explore the layering and removal of water-based paint, similar to my past use of watercolour, using earth pigments. This worked well for one piece but I soon strayed back to the more recent pattern approach that working with earth pigments has inspired.

My method, as in the past, allows the pigments, the colours, textures and forms, to suggest and reveal the form of the finished piece. It can often take a while for the painting to evolve, employing a variety of accumulated intuitive, mark making and aesthetic decisions and skills to move forward. Working in this way is always fascinating, offering outcomes beyond my present understandings.

back to basics 1 – earth pigment dreaming (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015back to basics 1 – earth pigment dreaming (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015

back to basics 2 – black form dreaming (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015back to basics 2 – black form dreaming (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015

back to basics 3 – joyful exchanges (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015back to basics 3 – joyful exchanges (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015

back to basics 4 –  unctuous burnt umber (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015back to basics 4 – unctuous burnt umber (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015

back to basics 5 – grey and cream earth (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015back to basics 5 – grey and cream earth (earth pigments on watercolour paper) © p ward 2015

Each painting measures 21x21cm and is on 300gsm watercolour paper. The pigments, a selection of six hand ground, locally gathered colours from North Devon, have been simply mixed with water and then fixed with pastel fixative. I am now looking forward to making more simple paintings on paper of different sizes to develop this approach.

The original paintings are available for sale online or later in the year at our new studio space at Hele Corn Mill, near Ilfracombe in North Devon.

For more information please contact me at earth.northdevon@gmail.com

© P Ward 2016


Soil Culture: The Publication

The Soil Culture project led by CCANW and RANE will be drawing to a close soon with its final exhibition at Peninsula Arts in Plymouth from 16th January to 19th March 2016[i]. The project as has been documented in a 120-page publication with essays by prominent soil scientists and soil artists, along with illustrated accounts of residencies and other activities enjoyed during the 3-years.

soil culture – the publication (cover), images © p ward 2015soil culture – the publication (cover), images © p ward 2015

My involvement in the project began when I met CCANW director Clive Adams in 2009. I presented him with six small glass pots of ground earth pigments from North Devon. He suggested I meet soil artist Dr Daro Montag at Falmouth University who was just starting an MA Art & Environment Course, which I subsequently attended.

north devon landscape (ground earth pigments) © p ward 2008north devon landscape (ground earth pigments) © p ward 2008

I was invited to join the Soil Culture project development team in 2011. My contribution has also involved workshops, exhibitions and some of the imagery used to promote and support it. I was recently asked to write a short essay for the publication and retake a series of photographs of ground and raw earth pigments to be used for the cover and chapter/section headings…

Soil Culture - The Publication images © p ward 2015raw and ground earth pigments for soil culture publication © p ward 2015

The publication is available from http://www.ccanw.co.uk/ at a price of £15 per copy.

 

© p ward 2016

[i] Peninsula Arts Gallery, Roland Levinsky Building, Plymouth University, PL4 8AA.
Open Monday-Friday 10am-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm

 


eARTh has MOVED…

MIDWINTER OPEN STUDIO

Saturday 28th and Sunday 29th November, 1100-1600

After an exciting first year, including a great exhibition at the White Moose Gallery, a number of successful workshops and OPEN STUDIOS and participation in other international projects, eARTh has relocated to a smaller, more rural space at Hele Corn Mill where we (myself and partner Francesca Owen) will be continuing our work with local earth pigments and plant dyes.

eARTh at Hele Corn Mill hele corn mill and eARTh studio © f owen 2015

Hele Corn Mill dates from 1525 and is a unique working watermill in North Devon. Located just 300m from stunning Hele Bay beach just east of Ilfracombe, a visit to the mill makes a perfect family visit. Opposite the mill is the Miller’s Wife Tearoom, where you can relax and enjoy a traditional cream tea or a slice of one of many delicious cakes, which are homemade every day. For directions, parking and opening times please visit www.helecornmill.com.

You are warmly invited to a pre-Christmas opening – a chat, some nibbles, a glass of wine and some art. If you cannot make the opening please feel free to visit anytime. eARTh will be open on a regular basis along with workshops, exhibitions and events throughout the year and is looking forward to seeing you soon.

For more information please visit www.earthnorthdevon.wix.com/arts

© P Ward 2015