Morocco – Marrakech, Imlil, Essaouira

early spring 2015

It is difficult to concisely express the accumulated experience of 9 days (216 hours) in such a different culture and environment with a year old baby and loving partner. I was quietly determined to take only a few photos, to try to keep the experience more ‘whole’ through sensory memory alone. Of course, the phone camera was hard to resist and some moments were captured digitally both as sound and image, albeit rather inadequately, along with a handwritten list of bird and animal species. Suffice to say I also enjoyed some fantastic bundles of sticks, carried by people and animals alike, and a wonderful array of earth colours in the foothills of the High Atlas Mountains. But to sum up, the lingering sensation is that of movement, of change, of noise and smell and taste, of clamour, of conversations, of frustration, deliberation and joy, of meetings and departures, hellos and goodbyes, of a small boy waving and waving with a mouth full of berber bread and happy adoring faces, of colour, of heat, of wind and mountains and sea, of arid brightness and intensity, and then of a return to the soft, patchwork of rolling subdued earthy tones and a familiar English winter landscape from on high.

Here is a selection of the images taken by Francesca and myself (depending on who was holding the camera/baby at the time)…

bicycle-door-wall, marrakeck © f owen 2015bicycle-door-wall, marrakech © f owen 2015

dye smeared gateway, marrakeck tannery © f owen 2015dye smeared gateway, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015

rug showroom, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015rug showroom, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015

‘indigo’ scarf, marrakech wool dye shop © f owen 2015‘indigo’ scarf, marrakech wool dye shop © f owen 2015

bulbul; house bunting, marrakech © p ward 2015bulbul; house bunting, marrakech © p ward 2015

painted metal sheets, marrakech © p ward 2015painted metal sheets, marrakech © p ward 2015

rocks, tamatert, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015rocks, tamatert, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

sticks and blankets, aroumd, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015sticks and blankets, aroumd, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

firing the hammam, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015firing the hammam, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

painted path marker, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015painted path marker, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

boxes, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015boxes, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

graffiti, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015graffiti, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

stairwell, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015stairwell, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

fish cart, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015fish cart, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

palette, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015palette, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

rubbed-down hull, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015rubbed-down hull, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

earth juice stall, essaouira © f owen 2015earth juice stall, essaouira © f owen 2015

children’s mural project, essaouira © f owen 2015children’s mural project, essaouira © f owen 2015

old town, essaouira © f owen 2015old town, essaouira © f owen 2015

shops, essaouira © f owen & p ward 2015shops, essaouira © f owen & p ward 2015

evening promenade, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015evening promenade, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

riad beldy, essaouira © p ward 2015riad beldy, essaouira © p ward 2015

collection, morocco © p ward 2015collection, morocco © p ward 2015

home again, the south downs from the plane © p ward 2015home again, the south downs from the plane © p ward 2015

Many thanks to Francesca, Noah and all the people and creatures of Morocco who made our time so good.

© p ward 2015


 

1. http://karol-kochanowski.com/ – a lovely artist we met in marrakech

2. http://www.galeriedamgaard.com/ – a great gallery showing distinctive primitive local art in essaouira

3. http://francescaowen.wix.com/arts  – the wonderful francesca owen no less…


Karol 25215

.

I met a man in Marrakech from Manchester.

He was Polish.

He told me how the red-legged storks that reeled high above the Medina walls

Nested in his home town in Poland,

Migrating to spend their winters in Morocco.

 .

There was a certain poetry to his tale I felt

That made me smile.

.

I told him how the delicate Painted Lady Butterfly

Flew from Northern Africa and Spain

To southern England every year

To breed and to die.

memories of marrakech, earth pigments and gold powder paint on canvas © p ward 2015memories of marrakech, earth pigments and gold powder paint on canvas © p ward 2015

© p ward 2015


This morning I awoke to the sound of birdsong…

This morning I awoke to the sound of birdsong drifting through dawn-lit windows

The small, humble things in life offering sustenance in this big, big world

Spring hath sprung…

birdsong, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015birdsong, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015

“Curiously in amongst this plethora of Buddhism there was one token of Christianity – the autobiography of St Teresa of Lisieux. In spite of Tenzin Palmo’s antipathy to the Christian religion in general, she was drawn to the French saint who had entered a Carmelite nunnery when she was just fifteen and who had died at the age of twenty-four. She read her story several times and could quote from it at will.

‘The ironic thing is that the “little way” that she wrote about had nothing to do with the Way that I practiced. What I liked about her, however, was that she was very sensible. She sometimes slept through the church services and it did not worry her that she slept. God would have to accept her as she was! She never worried about her faults so long as her aspiration was right! She had this thing that she was like a small bird scratching around looking for seeds, glancing at the sun but not flying near it. She reasoned that she didn’t have to because the sun was shining even on a small being like a bird. Her whole attitude was very nice. She described herself as “a little flower” by the wayside which nobody sees but in its own self is very perfect as it is. And to me that is her primary message – that even in small, little ways we can be fulfilling our purpose and that in little things we can accomplish much.’[i]

bird, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015bird, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015

hare, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015hare, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015

bird, grass, egg, moon, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015bird, grass, egg, moon, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015

(Drawings from recent experiments with compressed charcoal.)

© p ward 2015


[i] From Cave in the Snow by Vicki Mackenzie, the inspiring true story of how an English woman from the East in of London became a fully ordained Tibetan nun, spending 12 years in isolated meditation in a cave in the Himalayan foothills during the latter half of the 20th Century.


500 children!!

NEWPORT COMMUNITY INFANT ACADEMY ARTSWEEK 2015 – Soil Culture*

500 children, communal painting, earth pigments on canvas © p ward 2015500 children, communal painting, earth pigments on canvas © p ward 2015

I was recently invited to develop and lead environmental art activities for Newport Community School in Barnstaple, North Devon. The activities offered opportunities for staff and pupils to explore and celebrate our relationships with Nature, in particular soil and local earth pigments. The school has 500 pupils between 3 and 12 years old. A range of activities, including mud painting, making soil balls, bundles of sticks and leaf sorting, were presented to the teaching staff and then left for them to interpret. The communal artworks created were included in an exhibition for children and parents at the end of the week and a 6x1m earth pigment painting made by the whole school was left as legacy of the week’s hard work.

For me to develop such a large-scale event for so many was extremely daunting – how teachers do it day-in-day-out is amazing! It was incredible to see a painting evolve at the hands of 500 children, with only the most arbitrary guidelines, to become a vibrant expression of their experience and of North Devon itself. All participatory group paintings I have facilitated have somehow turned out well, but I have never tried it with 500 children before, and it is certainly a way of working I hope to pursue further in the future. The other simple activities, and reflection upon them, seemed to give children and staff space to try something new and also a space to learn through a different, more hands-on approach. The whole event has given me a great deal of satisfaction and confidence to tackle such events again in the future.

The exhibition was well attended by some most bemused but interested parents looking for their individual child’s work only to find it absorbed into the totality. The school, to their credit, thoroughly got behind both the educational and experiential value of art activities and also the contemporary conceptual nature of the final exhibition. Many thanks to Georgie Treanor for helping organize ARTSWEEK and to the children, teachers and staff for their patient and enthusiastic participation, and to Francesca for her support and help preparing the canvas.

francesca hemming the canvas © p ward 2015francesca hemming the canvas © p ward 2015

soil . making paint . local history . geology . local resources . environment . culture

earth pigment logo © p ward 2010

INTRODUCTION to TEACHERS PACK

“Art does not reproduce the visible, but makes visible” Paul Klee

Art is one way we learn about the world. The learning and creative processes are based on both sensory experience and reflection. The process and expression of such experience is what we know as Art. From the beginning of human history we have learnt about the world through experience of the materials that are available in our immediate surroundings. From this experience, and through trial and error, we have developed the technologies to enable us to survive. As communications and transport have become more versatile and far reaching we have often lost our knowledge and understanding of the local environment and the materials it provides.

In North Devon, as elsewhere, our culture and identity as a region has been based on the natural resources available. For many centuries the chief industries were mining, for iron and copper, and sheep farming wool on the steep hills and valleys. The soils have promoted a rich and varied agriculture from dairy and beef cattle to crops. Bideford and Barnstaple both had large potteries supplied by clay pits in Fremington and Peters Marland. The potteries have unfortunately closed now but the white ball clay pits at Peters Marland and Meeth still quarry and export clay for use in brick- and paper-making. And, of course, Bideford has a black earth pigment named after it that was mined until 1969. Bideford Black was used in the boat industry, to paint tanks in WW2 and by Max Factor to make mascara.

By learning about the materials in our local environment and appreciating their importance to our lives it is hoped that we may also learn to respect them a little more.

“Sitting quietly, doing nothing, spring comes, and the grass grows by itself” Zen Proverb

THE ACTIVITIES

  • THE SOUND OF CHILDREN LISTENING – we have quietly listened to the wind and trees and birds and the sounds of Newport. We have felt the sun and wind and rain on our faces and the earth beneath our feet.

circles made by walking © p ward 2015circles made by walking © p ward 2015

  • CIRCLES MADE BY WALKING – we have been walking in big circles on the playing field, making big muddy drawings with our feet.

a workshop for a week © p ward 2015a workshop for a week © p ward 2015

presentation display © p ward 2015presentation display © p ward 2015

paint making table © p ward 2015paint making table © p ward 2015

work in progress © p ward 2015work in progress © p ward 2015

500 children, communal painting, earth pigments on canvas (detail) © p ward 2015500 children, communal painting, earth pigments on canvas (detail) © p ward 2015

  • 500 children – communal painting on canvas by all members of the school using North Devon Earth Pigments. We have learnt about where paint comes from, how the rocks it is made from are formed, where they can be found in North Devon and how to make paint before adding our mark to the big painting.

soil investigation table © p ward 2015soil investigation table © p ward 2015

  • Soil Balls – we have been investigating soil brought in by teachers from around North Devon to see what it is made of and what creatures live in it and then forming it into balls with our hands.

500 soil balls, exhibition table 1 © p ward 2015500 soil balls, exhibition table 1 © p ward 2015

500 soil balls, exhibition table 2 © p ward 2015500 soil balls, exhibition table 2 © p ward 2015

leaf collage, display table © p ward 2015leaf collage, display table © p ward 2015

  • LEAF COLLAGES – we have been collecting leaves and sorting them to see how many different plants, shapes and colours there are.

charcoal leaf drawings 1 © p ward 2015charcoal leaf drawings 1 © p ward 2015

charcoal leaf drawings 2 © p ward 2015charcoal leaf drawings 2 © p ward 2015

  • CHARCOAL DRAWINGS – we have been looking very closely at leaves and drawing them using charcoal.

500 BUNDLES OF STICKS, exhibition table © p ward 2015500 BUNDLES OF STICKS, exhibition table © p ward 2015

  • BUNDLES OF STICKS – we have been gathering sticks from the playing field and tying them together. This simple activity has led to discussions about fuel, building materials and ways of tying things.

dirty hands and cordyline structures © p ward 2015dirty hands and cordyline structures © p ward 2015

  • DIRTY HANDS – we have been getting our hands ‘dirty’, covering them and some paper with mud.

cordyline structures 1 © p ward 2015cordyline structures 1 © p ward 2015

cordyline structures 2 © p ward 2015cordyline structures 2 © p ward 2015

  • CORDYLINE STRUCTURES – we have been using cordyline leaves to explore natural fibres and making all sorts of things from them.

word wall © p ward 2015word wall © p ward 2015

  • WORD WALL – we have been writing down words that the ARTSWEEK activities have inspired.

exhibition space and slide show in the assembly hall © p ward 2015exhibition space and slide show in the assembly hall © p ward 2015

  • SLIDE SHOW – here are some pictures of us exploring, creating and enjoying the activities this ARTSWEEK.

remnants - soil balls, leaves and bundles of sticks returned to the playing field after the exhibition 1 © p wardremnants – soil balls, leaves and bundles of sticks returned to the playing field after the exhibition 1 © p ward

remnants - soil balls, leaves and bundles of sticks returned to the playing field after the exhibition 2 © p wardremnants – soil balls, leaves and bundles of sticks returned to the playing field after the exhibition 2 © p ward

© p ward 2015


 To see more of the work visit http://www.newportprimary.devon.sch.uk/artsweek-19th-23rd-january-2015/

* Soil Culture is a project by the Centre for Contemporary Arts & the Natural World to raise awareness about soil through the arts (www.ccanw.co.uk)

 


garden waste, woodford 161214

spotted flycatcher bundle, woodford © p ward 2014spotted flycatcher bundle, woodford © p ward 2014

a pleasant few days break in west somerset

after a week of hard work inside the studio.

despite a forecast of persistent heavy rain

and a recurrent mechanical inconvenience

there was sunshine

a chance to tidy the garden

to the sound of wind shaking the trees and familiar birdsong

inspiring peace of mind and a few life-art works

to celebrate the simplicity, beauty and creativity of nature

reflections of place and time and relationship

with thanks…

garden waste, woodford 161214garden waste, woodford © p ward 2014

Waste and wastes implies unwanted or unusable materials. The term is often subjective (because waste to one person is not necessarily waste to another) and sometimes objectively inaccurate…[i]

another line made by walking, woodford © p ward 2014another line made by walking, woodford © p ward 2014

In preparation for a local school’s artsweek I will be leading at the end of January I have been researching some very basic materials such as sticks and leaves and mud, and wheelbarrows… I have been invited, as an environmental artist, to develop a series of activities to engage 500 children between the ages of 4 and 12, and their teachers, with ideas of local ecology, its influence on the region’s historical development and our current relationship with it. 2015 being the UN International Year of Soils, and being one of my own specialisms, I have chosen the theme of SOIL. The activities will allow children and teachers to explore and hopefully learn something about the nature of soil and its importance in all our lives. The activities, designed to be starting points for creative journeys for teachers to explore with their classes, will also lead to an end of week environmental art exhibition including work made by every child in the school. The centrepiece will be a large earth pigment painting built up during the week by the children and finished by a group of ‘gifted and talented’ students who have shown a particular aptitude and interest in the arts. The painting will be left as a legacy for the school and acknowledgement of the hard work accomplished during the week. Hopefully the children and teachers will have an enjoyable and memorable time.

© p ward 2014


 

[i] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waste


eARTh MIDWINTER OPEN studio 2014

reVIEW…

Many thanks to everyone who came along and shared their support for eARTh, both in person and on line. Despite the cold (our central heating packed up during some of the coldest, wettest, windiest weather so far this year) we had a good number of interested and interesting visitors, some great ideas shared, some good work done and even some work sold. It was really encouraging to see our ideas taking shape and to have others excited and wanting to share in them. We are presently putting together a series of initial events and activities for 2015 based on discussions had during the week including a contemporary environmental art support group, open space days, painting and dyeing workshops, a number of meetings, two more open studio events (Ilfracombe Art Trail and North Devon Art Trek) and a few residencies, including a visitor from Canada exploring natural pigment binders and some performers from the Netherlands.

Here are a few images of the work done for and during the OPEN STUDIO…

eARTh logo, gesso on slate © p ward 2014eARTh logo, gesso on slate © p ward 2014

WARofWORDS, earth pigments of paper © p ward 2014WARofWORDS, earth pigments of paper © p ward 2014

shimmer, earth pigments on paper © p ward 2014shimmer, earth pigments on paper © p ward 2014

“Then, when the waters sank, the great goddess smiled again and in her heart declared herself for man. She blessed the harvests, and her gentle spirit was ever in the fields and granaries; and in the long evenings, she loved to take her ease in some countryman’s home and listen to the talk of sunshine and grain, and new shoots and old trees and the mischief-making nymphs.”

from The God Beneath the Sea by Leon Garfield and Edward Blishen.

OPEN STUDIO day 7 with dance artist Katy Lee, Bideford Youth Group, Home Grown Kids and environmental artist and youth worker Andy Branston © p ward 2014OPEN STUDIO day 7 with dance artist Katy Lee, Bideford Youth Group, Home Grown Kids and environmental artist and youth worker Andy Branston © p ward 2014

francesca working on 9 months, inside and out, oil and earth on canvas © p ward 2014francesca working on 9 months, inside and out, oil and earth on canvas © p ward 2014

eARTh studio view, including paintings by francesca owen and pigment table © p ward 2014eARTh studio view, including paintings by francesca owen and pigment table © p ward 2014

femme, earth pigment and watercolour on paper © p ward and f owen 2014femme, earth pigment and watercolour on paper © p ward and f owen 2014

for display purposes only, ilfracombe cake and chaise longue © p ward and f owen 2014for display purposes only, ilfracombe cake and chaise longue © p ward and f owen 2014

bideford black hand spiral by elspeth © p ward 2014bideford black hand spiral by ella © p ward 2014

shared painting table at eARTh © f owen 2014shared painting table at eARTh © f owen 2014

music, earth pigments on paper © p ward 2014music, earth pigments on paper © p ward 2014

learning, bideford blackboard and shelf with chalk, charcoal and birch bundle © p ward 2014learning, bideford blackboard on shelf with chalk, charcoal and birch bundle © p ward 2014

If you have any further ideas, no matter how small, that you would like to explore or ways you would like to utilize the space please contact us directly. We would love to share and develop our work with others of common interest and intent so please don’t hesitate to get in touch. Similarly, if you would like to be kept informed of our work and events please send us your email address and we will add you to our mailing list.

© p ward 2014


autumn winter, north devon 2014

with thanks this midwinter…

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see Nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see Nature at all.

But to the eyes of the man of imagination, Nature is imagination itself.”

William Blake[i]

st james church arlington court; river yeo © p ward 2014st james church arlington court; river yeo © p ward 2014

from crow point to hartland 1 © p ward 2014from crow point to hartland 1 © p ward 2014

from crow point to hartland 2 © p ward 2014from crow point to hartland 2 © p ward 2014

st peter’s graveyard, ilfracombe © p ward 2014st peter’s graveyard, ilfracombe © p ward 2014

ilfracombe © p ward 2014ilfracombe © p ward 2014

net, ilfracombe; from woolcombe to putsborough © p ward 2014net, ilfracombe; from woolcombe to putsborough © p ward 2014

from woolcombe to lundy © p ward 2014from woolcombe to lundy © p ward 2014

© p ward 2014


[i] This quote from 17th Century visionary and mystic artist William Blake was taken from the January February 2015 issue of Resurgence/The Ecologist magazine (http://www.resurgence.org/) where I am fortunate enough to have a painting published to accompany an article by environmental activist Vandana Shiva – ‘We are Soil’.

 

 

 

 


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