Saying hello to the Faeries…

One week on the Isle of Man, 2015

It is nearly thirty years since I last visited Ellan Vannin – the Manx name for the Isle of Man. Situated in the middle of the emerald waters of the Irish Sea, within sight of England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Heaven, so it is said, this self-governed commonwealth nation is probably best known for the yearly motorcycle TT race. For me, as an idealistic teenager surrounded by radical older students, it became a place of great significance in my own spiritual development. For the Celts it was the centre of the Faerie Empire, the royal thrones sitting atop the second highest mountain, South Barrule. Even today, respect for the other realms is still very much in evidence. Beyond this the island, once you have accepted the proliferation of lycra-clad outdoor pursuits, the squeals of cliff-leaping coasteerers and the constant stream of motorcyclists, is still a peaceful haven with stunning views and coastline, a place of folklore, local heritage and marine and avian wildlife.

manx dog by unknown artist, fired clay; carpets; crushed quartz pebbledash, Port Erin © p ward 2015Manx dog by unknown artist, fired clay; carpets; crushed quartz pebbledash, Port Erin © p ward 2015

Port Erin garden I-IV © p ward 2015Port Erin garden I-IV © p ward 2015

malachite and sea glass, Port Erin © p ward 2015malachite and sea glass, Port Erin © p ward 2015

found stick figure, Silverdale Glen © p ward 2015found stick figure, Silverdale Glen © p ward 2015

Mull Tomb Circle; Lochtan sheep; Manx thatch, Cregneash © p ward and f owen 2015Mull Tomb Circle; Lochtan sheep; Manx thatch, Cregneash © p ward and f owen 2015

The Chasms I-III, Port St Mary © p ward 2015The Chasms I-III, Port St Mary © p ward 2015

The Sugarloaf; Spanish Head, Port St Mary © p ward 2015The Sugarloaf; Spanish Head, Port St Mary © p ward 2015

Ramsey I-III © p ward 2015Ramsey I-III © p ward 2015

standing stones, Ramsey © p ward 2015standing stones, Ramsey © p ward 2015
discarded herrings, Peel; discarded scallop shells; bracken, Fleshwick © p ward 2015discarded herrings, Peel; discarded scallop shells; bracken, Fleshwick © p ward 2015

full moon, Port Erin © p ward 2015full moon, Port Erin © p ward 2015

from South Barrule © f owen 2015from South Barrule © f owen 2015

heather bundle, South Barrule © p ward 2015heather bundle, South Barrule © p ward 2015

from Bradda Head I-II © p ward 2015from Bradda Head I-II © p ward 2015

from Bradda Head III © p ward 2015from Bradda Head III © p ward 2015

Thank you to my family for treating us to this short holiday and this time to restore my connection to those things that inspire my living.

special people, IOM © p ward 2015special people, IOM © p ward 2015

© P Ward 2015

From love to nothing 21015


I do not recall the moment

The shift in feeling

From love to nothing

From excitement and anticipation

To no sense


Nor what event or action caused such change

A switch switched off silently

A light that goes out

And turning away from

But towards nowhere and no one


I do not know what to say or do

(Everything is the same as ever)

How to create new life without a care

To breach a gulf of non-misunderstanding

For a tide to rise again for the first time


And carry me

And you

To warmth

And purpose

I will

from love to nothing, feock, cornwall © pward 2015
from love to nothing, feock, cornwall © pward 2015

© P Ward 2015

of black and white 15815

3 peregrines, hillsborough © p ward 20153 peregrines, hillsborough © p ward 2015

of black and white i have become acquainted

shifting material tonality contextually alighting itself in emotion

the falcons’ tumbling play from the high hill cliff top nearby

between myself and the evening sun, i became blind

your overarching display tantamount to simple exquisite perfection

as well timed as it was


there is black

and there is black


there is white

and white


a way to describe


a fleeting perception of this place and that

of an occurrence personally experienced

a mere scribble by comparison

a fumbling juxtaposition

in the face of complexity


it will just have to do

it is all i have

beyond itself here


i do not wish to be spoon-fed

the spoon is soiled with black


a black arches awaits nightfall on white bathroom tiles


i have had another 5 minutes of fame

when will it end?

fossil tree fern stem and silver spoon used for digging bideford black, greencliff © p ward 2015fossil tree fern stem and silver spoon used for digging bideford black, greencliff © p ward 2015

black arches, ilfracombe © p ward 2015black arches, ilfracombe © p ward 2015

© P Ward 2015

Escape to the Country

just another day in the life of an earth pigment artist…

I was recently invited by the popular television property show ‘Escape to the Country’ (Freemantle Media) to help with a local interest article about Bideford Black. Despite very inclement weather for August we spent an enjoyable morning on the beach and cliff top near the outcrop of pigment, accompanied of course by a chorus of local ravens, oystercatchers, gulls and a single peregrine falcon. The presenter, Alistair Appleton, was completely surprised by the ‘blackness’ and quality of the pigment and became quickly absorbed in his brief painting experience. It was fascinating to see behind the scenes, work alongside the team for a while and also get an opportunity to share my work with a new audience – the show reaches about 16 million people! It will be broadcast on BBC2 sometime during the next few months.

on location at greencliff and paintings by the team © p ward and courtesy n wilkinson ( 2015on location at greencliff and paintings by the team © p ward and courtesy n wilkinson ( 2015

© P Ward 2015

painting together workshops at the white moose

To accompany our[i] recent exhibition, painting together, at the White Moose Gallery[ii] in Barnstaple, we offered three workshops to explore the possibilities of creative collaboration through painting with local earth pigments. The first two workshops consisted of morning visits to prominent pigment sites followed by afternoons making paint and painting together on a shared canvas in the gallery. The third workshop was spent entirely in the gallery and looked closer at paint making techniques before using rocks and soils gathered in the previous outings to work with.

North Devon has an extremely rich geology – a combination of Devonian, Carboniferous, Perma-Triassic and more recent glacial deposits – that has shaped the way we have and still relate to the environment. Glacial clays have provided excellent material for local potteries. Copper, iron, sliver and tin were mined on Exmoor. Culm grasslands have offered fertile grazing for beef, dairy and other livestock. And different earth pigments have been extracted for both industrial and artistic applications. Bideford Black (and anthracite) was mined across the region until 1969, while raw umber was extracted from locations around Combe Martin[iii]. But wherever we go there is always an incredibly varied spectrum of earth colours to be used, representing and celebrating sense of place however we choose to express ourselves.

Sharing a surface to work on – in this case a previously prepared canvas – was found to be a fun, if sometimes frustrating, but rewarding and liberating experience. Sharing the whole experience – gathering pigments, making paint, sharing lunch and conversation, working on a communal surface and finally reflecting on the day – offered new ways of working beyond the more often isolated practice we enjoy. It’s not for all but can help shift our practice as artists into new areas, seeing how others work, observing our own methods, habits and expectations from a different perspective and raising interesting questions of ownership, value and public perception towards communal ways of working.

fremington quay eARTh walk 27615

fremington quay eARTh walk 1 © eARTh and K McEndoo 2015fremington quay eARTh walk 1 © eARTh and K McEndoo 2015

A first impression of Fremington Quay may be that of a fairly non-descript quay on the bend of a muddy estuary. However, when we look a bit deeper a rich history is evident. It was once one of the largest ports in the southwest, exporting iron, wool and clay, amongst other local products, around the world and importing coal and lime from South Wales. Until recently the Quay was a major railway siding, replaced now by the Tarka Trail cycle path extending from Barnstaple to the Ball Clay quarries at Meeth and Peters Marland south of Torrington. Its history is excellently displayed in the newly refurbished museum at the equally excellent café in the old station building.

The Quay sits broadly on the meeting of the Devonian (450 million years ago) and Carboniferous (350 million years ago) geological eras, a weakness in strata marked by the River Taw’s meandering intersection. The underlying carboniferous shales, slates and mudstones of the Crackington Beds, extend west to Hartland Point, and are capped on the southern banks of the estuary by glacial deposits from the Flandrian Ice Age 40,000 years ago. All this creates ideal conditions for the amazing array of pigments to be found along the low cliffs beyond the large disused stone limekiln west of the quay. A few miles inland Fremington clay pits provided fine red clay until 2013, helping establish and maintain the local potteries in Barnstaple and Bideford. The clays were laid down as sediments in glacial lakes and riverbeds. The folds, cracks and twists in the sedimentary carboniferous rocks allow for oxidization of minerals, offering an exquisite range of colours and textures. Some have said that in other countries the site would be considered a national heritage site. For now however it is protected as a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

I first came across the site when walking my dog many years ago, noticing the fantastic colours and rocks. However, it wasn’t until I started seriously researching earth pigments that I actually touched the rocks and found the colour. I have since visited with eminent geologists form the Ussher Society and Devonshire Association to learn more about it – although to be honest I wonder if I have not become just more confused, each ‘expert’ offering a different theory of the areas formation, age and make-up.

fremington quay eARTh walk 2 © eARTh and K McEndoo 2015fremington quay eARTh walk 2 © eARTh and K McEndoo 2015

For the painting together workshop the participants were bowled over by both the area’s history and geology and the amazing array of colours available. The painting we made is, I think evidence, of the lively experience and the richness of the site. It was subsequently hung in the Create Centre in Bristol as part of the Soil Culture exhibition.

fremington quay eARTh walk, earth pigments on canvas © eARTh, K McEndoo, S Levy 2015fremington quay eARTh walk, earth pigments on canvas © eARTh, K McEndoo, S Levy 2015

Greencliff eARTh walk 15715

Bideford Black has become popular among artists recently, after numerous projects focusing on its local significance and artistic potential. This workshop was therefore, not surprisingly, well attended with 10 participants and thankfully the weather was glorious. While the Bideford Black deposits exposed at Greencliff were the main attraction, there is a good range of other usable pigments easily accessible from the attendant sandstones and clays – white, grey, orange and pink rocks and clays were gathered, along with other beach detritus, and taken back to be enjoyed in the afternoon painting session.

Greencliff eARTh walk workshop 1 © eARTh 2015Greencliff eARTh walk workshop 1 © eARTh 2015

Greencliff eARTh walk workshop 2 © eARTh 2015Greencliff eARTh walk workshop 2 © eARTh 2015

There being more people made for a quite chaotic and crowded painting together experience, with two smaller canvasses being provided to take a specific place in the White Moose show. Limitations and parameters are an important aspect of any creative process and these were discussed at length within the context of the day’s workshop. Participants ranged from experienced artists and students to designers and other interested parties. Again the results and insights gained were an exciting reflection on the site, its history ad geology, the materials and the day’s events.

greencliff eARTh walk I & II, earth pigments on canvas © eARTh 2015greencliff eARTh walk I & II, earth pigments on canvas © eARTh 2015

painting together, White Moose 25715

After a brief overview of previous workshops and introduction to the materials, the final workshop experimented with various methods of paint making including using egg tempera, gum Arabic and PVA glue as binders. As a theme we focused on water and the sea. The rocks, clays and soils we were using were predominantly sedimentary, being laid down thousands and hundreds of millions of years ago under the ocean, by rivers, in lakes or by ice in glacial times. This is an idea that Francesca and myself are both interested to investigate and participants were happy to indulge us.

painting together workshop © eARTh 2015painting together workshop © eARTh 2015

The group shared their own experiences and relationships with water, and more specifically the sea, and continued to use this as a focus for mark making, imagery and discussion throughout the process. We thought of immersion, of healing, of play, of floating and sinking, of mysterious and murky depths and of a power wild and untamable. We painted creatures and waves. We blew bubbles. We wallowed in mud. One of the challenges was to paint the sea without the colour blue! The paintings success for me lay in its obscurity, its vagueness and shifting focus. Were we beneath the sea or floating in primordial swamp, part of it or separate? Its hard to tell, but we had a great day making it.

the sea, earth pigments on canvas © eARTh 2015the sea, earth pigments on canvas © eARTh 2015

Many thanks to Karen and Stella and to all those who took part in the workshops, to all who visited and enjoyed the exhibition, to all who contributed to the work and especially to the White Moose for hosting the exhibition. Unfortunately, we didn’t sell any work and had to cancel the ‘in conversation’ event through lack of interest but maybe that is a sign of the times or of a prevailing attitude in North Devon towards more contemporary/conceptual art forms but also an interesting reflection on people’s response to communal work. But whatever each time we entered the space we felt extremely proud and pleased with the show, with the work we had done together and the experience we had offered all who took part. We have thoroughly enjoyed it and hope to take the show further afield in due course.

But for now, all good things must come to an end…

un-painting the moose © eARTh 2015un-painting the moose © eARTh 2015

© P Ward 2015



[iii] According to local sources “no paint box was complete without Berrynarbour umber.” The pigment was mined until the 1790s and ground with ochre from East Down before being sent to London to be included in Reeves paint boxes. I have taken umber from the River Umber that runs through Combe Martin but as yet I have not located the quarries where it was mined.

Tales of the Riverbank: BLACK & WHITE

Many thanks to those who joined us for a splendid morning in the company of ex-Bideford Black miner Ron Pither, as we slowly walked the length of Mines Road in East-the-Water recalling days-gone-by, and for an expressive afternoon painting together with Bideford Black and white Peters Marland Ball clay onto a shared canvas at the old Bideford Art School on the Quay, as part of the first Tales of the Riverbank event organized by Bideford Bay Creatives. The events – workshops, walks and talks – spread throughout the summer, explore the natural and social history surrounding the River Torridge in North Devon.

a walk down memory lane, mines road © p ward 2015a walk down memory lane, mines road © p ward 2015

As we walked, Ron’s vivid and joyful recollections of his time as a miner and young man growing up in East-the-Water the 1950’s, laced with other historical details by myself, brought greater depth and colour to a seemingly non-descript lane on the outskirts of town. Mines Road, as the name suggests, used to lead to the Chapel Park pigment mines that finally closed in 1969 – there is little physical evidence left today to reveal its not too distant past. I had met Ron as part of the Story of Bideford Black project for the Burton Art Gallery in 2013 and he jumped at the opportunity to share more of his memories today.

painting together – BLACK & WHITE, a work in progress © p ward 2015painting together – BLACK & WHITE, a work in progress © p ward 2015

After lunch the small, but select, party of artists and others interested in local history worked together to create a painting that somehow responded to the memories shared during the walk and to the specific local materials provided. Decisions were made as a group at critical stages of the process regarding the definition of parameters and as to how the painting should progress, revealing individual and collective ideas about the creative process in general and the specific nature of the materials involved. The painting produced will be exhibited as part of Soil Culture at create in Bristol from July 8th.

painting together – BLACK & WHITE, the gallery © p ward 2015painting together – BLACK & WHITE, the gallery © p ward 2015

Many thanks also to Learn Devon for providing such a great space to conduct the workshop.

Further Links

P Ward 2015

painting together

an investigation in creative collaboration through painting

(in support of my/our latest exhibition in north devon)

painting together to save the world, images courtesy b stokes, s orrell 2011painting together to save the world, images courtesy b stokes, s orrell, p ward 2011

Pete Ward and Francesca Owen

White Moose Gallery, Trinity Street, Barnstaple, Devon, EX32 8HX

13th June – 1st August 2015

“Art does not reproduce the visible but makes visible” Paul Klee

painting together is a project by North Devon based artists Pete Ward and Francesca Owen that brings together concepts of contemporary art (dialogical art, ecopsychology, environmental awareness and process-based interdisciplinary collaboration) with the more traditional practice of paint making and painting from locally occurring earth pigments. While Pete and Francesca continue to work on individual projects in their shared studio space and on more collaborative pieces together, they will also be inviting selected artists and members of the public to take part in group paintings/makings in various settings and locations, offering workshops and space for reflection and feedback about the project and process involved.

painting together soil culture @ TH&TW © p ward 2012painting together, soil culture @ The Home & The World, Dartington Hall © p ward 2012

painting together early days © f owen, p ward 2011-13painting together, early days © f owen, p ward 2011-13

We have occasionally attempted to paint simultaneously, or in turns, on a surface with a fellow artist with varying results, the process often revealing the dynamic of egos and styles. In a similar way we are always responding to the relationship between ourselves as creative practitioners and the medium and environment with which we chose to work. Our experience of working with earth pigments has certainly led to a massive shift in practice both concerning our understanding and relationships with specific colours and the process involved. Earth pigments have also revealed a surprising freedom of expression and confidence seldom felt with more commercially available media – everyone just has a go! However, when working with other human beings a whole set of new questions and creative possibilities arise. For example, who owns the painting and to whom does credit for its creation lie? At what point do our egos let go and the collective subconscious come into play, if at all? How much are our individual actions influenced and dictated by the dynamic ecology of the group? Do guidelines and prescribed parameters help or hinder the process and then how and to what extent? Is the sense of satisfaction of making work together the same or different from working as an individual and how? The ‘art work’ of ancient history and indigenous cultures that we presently enjoy is rarely attributed to a sole artist, but more to a group, tribe or moment/phase in earth’s history. Do these works of cultural expression reach beyond the ego to a place of shared experience, of shared intention and mutual respect for the world we inhabit? painting together as a process will hopefully begin to reveal a sense of art more aligned to such sentiments than the overriding individuality of modern times.

painting together, greencliff painting © f owen, p ward 2015painting together, greencliff © f owen, p ward 2015

painting together, for the love of art © eARTh 2015painting together, for the love of art © eARTh 2015

painting together, art trail © eARTh 2015painting together, art trail/art trek © eARTh 2015

Art may be seen as a space for creativity to take place, for time, ideas and materials to reveal thoughts and processes anew. Whether this is a painting, a poem, a film, a performance, activity or workshop is all the same. Art may be a catalyst for further creative action and thought rather than merely the product of such actions. It is not always for the artist to dictate any specific outcome but to provide and structure meaningful parameters within which we may engage, actively and imaginatively, with ourselves and the world. To make work with others, within a creatively conscious and reflective environment, is therefore an ideal situation to explore and reveal new and inspiring relationships, while also producing work beyond the ego of individual artists to represent a specific and relevant ecological dynamic.

painting together eARTh gown © f owen, s bamford, c thomas, p ward 2015painting together, eARTh gown © f owen, s bamford, c thomas, p ward 2015

painting together, soil culture peninsula arts © p ward, d williamson 2015painting together, soil culture peninsula arts © p ward, d williamson 2015

painting together soil culture dartington hall © p ward, CCANW 2015painting together, soil culture dartington hall © p ward, CCANW 2015

‘These projects mark the emergence of a body of contemporary art practice concerned with collaborative, and potentially emancipatory, forms of dialogue and conversation. While it is common for a work of art to provoke dialogue among viewers this typically occurs in response to a finished object. In these projects conversation becomes an integral part of the work itself.’

(Grant Kester, 2005)

painting together, annoying stuart fiddes © f owen, l hudson, r ara, p ward 2015painting together, annoying stuart fiddes / black, grey, white © f owen, l hudson, r ara, p ward 2015

painting together WHITE MOOSE © f owen, p ward 2015painting together, WHITE MOOSE mural © f owen, p ward 2015

painting together © f owen, p ward 2015painting together © f owen, p ward 2015

painting together will include opportunities to participate in communal art through workshops, artist’s talks and walks in the local environment as well as the exhibition at the White Moose Gallery in Barnstaple, North Devon. For more information see

further links

 painting together white moose logos © f owen, p ward 2015

The exhibition at White Moose Gallery has been organized in conjunction with the Centre for Contemporary Arts & the Natural World Soil Culture Project in the International Year of Soils 2015


P Ward 2015


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