Tales of the Riverbank: BLACK & WHITE

Many thanks to those who joined us for a splendid morning in the company of ex-Bideford Black miner Ron Pither, as we slowly walked the length of Mines Road in East-the-Water recalling days-gone-by, and for an expressive afternoon painting together with Bideford Black and white Peters Marland Ball clay onto a shared canvas at the old Bideford Art School on the Quay, as part of the first Tales of the Riverbank event organized by Bideford Bay Creatives. The events – workshops, walks and talks – spread throughout the summer, explore the natural and social history surrounding the River Torridge in North Devon.

a walk down memory lane, mines road © p ward 2015a walk down memory lane, mines road © p ward 2015

As we walked, Ron’s vivid and joyful recollections of his time as a miner and young man growing up in East-the-Water the 1950’s, laced with other historical details by myself, brought greater depth and colour to a seemingly non-descript lane on the outskirts of town. Mines Road, as the name suggests, used to lead to the Chapel Park pigment mines that finally closed in 1969 – there is little physical evidence left today to reveal its not too distant past. I had met Ron as part of the Story of Bideford Black project for the Burton Art Gallery in 2013 and he jumped at the opportunity to share more of his memories today.

painting together – BLACK & WHITE, a work in progress © p ward 2015painting together – BLACK & WHITE, a work in progress © p ward 2015

After lunch the small, but select, party of artists and others interested in local history worked together to create a painting that somehow responded to the memories shared during the walk and to the specific local materials provided. Decisions were made as a group at critical stages of the process regarding the definition of parameters and as to how the painting should progress, revealing individual and collective ideas about the creative process in general and the specific nature of the materials involved. The painting produced will be exhibited as part of Soil Culture at create in Bristol from July 8th.

painting together – BLACK & WHITE, the gallery © p ward 2015painting together – BLACK & WHITE, the gallery © p ward 2015

Many thanks also to Learn Devon for providing such a great space to conduct the workshop.

Further Links

P Ward 2015


painting together

an investigation in creative collaboration through painting

(in support of my/our latest exhibition in north devon)

painting together to save the world, images courtesy b stokes, s orrell 2011painting together to save the world, images courtesy b stokes, s orrell, p ward 2011

Pete Ward and Francesca Owen

White Moose Gallery, Trinity Street, Barnstaple, Devon, EX32 8HX

13th June – 1st August 2015

“Art does not reproduce the visible but makes visible” Paul Klee

painting together is a project by North Devon based artists Pete Ward and Francesca Owen that brings together concepts of contemporary art (dialogical art, ecopsychology, environmental awareness and process-based interdisciplinary collaboration) with the more traditional practice of paint making and painting from locally occurring earth pigments. While Pete and Francesca continue to work on individual projects in their shared studio space and on more collaborative pieces together, they will also be inviting selected artists and members of the public to take part in group paintings/makings in various settings and locations, offering workshops and space for reflection and feedback about the project and process involved.

painting together soil culture @ TH&TW © p ward 2012painting together, soil culture @ The Home & The World, Dartington Hall © p ward 2012

painting together early days © f owen, p ward 2011-13painting together, early days © f owen, p ward 2011-13

We have occasionally attempted to paint simultaneously, or in turns, on a surface with a fellow artist with varying results, the process often revealing the dynamic of egos and styles. In a similar way we are always responding to the relationship between ourselves as creative practitioners and the medium and environment with which we chose to work. Our experience of working with earth pigments has certainly led to a massive shift in practice both concerning our understanding and relationships with specific colours and the process involved. Earth pigments have also revealed a surprising freedom of expression and confidence seldom felt with more commercially available media – everyone just has a go! However, when working with other human beings a whole set of new questions and creative possibilities arise. For example, who owns the painting and to whom does credit for its creation lie? At what point do our egos let go and the collective subconscious come into play, if at all? How much are our individual actions influenced and dictated by the dynamic ecology of the group? Do guidelines and prescribed parameters help or hinder the process and then how and to what extent? Is the sense of satisfaction of making work together the same or different from working as an individual and how? The ‘art work’ of ancient history and indigenous cultures that we presently enjoy is rarely attributed to a sole artist, but more to a group, tribe or moment/phase in earth’s history. Do these works of cultural expression reach beyond the ego to a place of shared experience, of shared intention and mutual respect for the world we inhabit? painting together as a process will hopefully begin to reveal a sense of art more aligned to such sentiments than the overriding individuality of modern times.

painting together, greencliff painting © f owen, p ward 2015painting together, greencliff © f owen, p ward 2015

painting together, for the love of art © eARTh 2015painting together, for the love of art © eARTh 2015

painting together, art trail © eARTh 2015painting together, art trail/art trek © eARTh 2015

Art may be seen as a space for creativity to take place, for time, ideas and materials to reveal thoughts and processes anew. Whether this is a painting, a poem, a film, a performance, activity or workshop is all the same. Art may be a catalyst for further creative action and thought rather than merely the product of such actions. It is not always for the artist to dictate any specific outcome but to provide and structure meaningful parameters within which we may engage, actively and imaginatively, with ourselves and the world. To make work with others, within a creatively conscious and reflective environment, is therefore an ideal situation to explore and reveal new and inspiring relationships, while also producing work beyond the ego of individual artists to represent a specific and relevant ecological dynamic.

painting together eARTh gown © f owen, s bamford, c thomas, p ward 2015painting together, eARTh gown © f owen, s bamford, c thomas, p ward 2015

painting together, soil culture peninsula arts © p ward, d williamson 2015painting together, soil culture peninsula arts © p ward, d williamson 2015

painting together soil culture dartington hall © p ward, CCANW 2015painting together, soil culture dartington hall © p ward, CCANW 2015

‘These projects mark the emergence of a body of contemporary art practice concerned with collaborative, and potentially emancipatory, forms of dialogue and conversation. While it is common for a work of art to provoke dialogue among viewers this typically occurs in response to a finished object. In these projects conversation becomes an integral part of the work itself.’

(Grant Kester, 2005)

painting together, annoying stuart fiddes © f owen, l hudson, r ara, p ward 2015painting together, annoying stuart fiddes / black, grey, white © f owen, l hudson, r ara, p ward 2015

painting together WHITE MOOSE © f owen, p ward 2015painting together, WHITE MOOSE mural © f owen, p ward 2015

painting together © f owen, p ward 2015painting together © f owen, p ward 2015

painting together will include opportunities to participate in communal art through workshops, artist’s talks and walks in the local environment as well as the exhibition at the White Moose Gallery in Barnstaple, North Devon. For more information see http://www.whitemoose.co.uk/site/painting-together/

further links

 painting together white moose logos © f owen, p ward 2015

The exhibition at White Moose Gallery has been organized in conjunction with the Centre for Contemporary Arts & the Natural World Soil Culture Project in the International Year of Soils 2015

 

P Ward 2015


painting with earth (again) … a new start

art trail ART TREK open studios 2015

Prompted and encouraged by our recent investigation at eARTh into natural paint binders with Clare Thomas and the opportunity to show some new work during two recent open studio events, I have been doing some painting…

vernal equinox 1 (51x31cm; earth pigments with gum arabic and rabbit skin glue on canvas) © p ward 2015vernal equinox 1 (51x31cm; earth pigments with gum arabic and rabbit skin glue on canvas) © p ward 2015

vernal equinox 2 (60x50cm; earth pigments with gum arabic on canvas) © p ward 2015vernal equinox 2 (60x50cm; earth pigments with gum arabic on canvas) © p ward 2015

storyteller 3 (50x50cm; earth pigments with gum arabic and rabbit skin glue on canvas) © p ward 2015storyteller 3 (50x50cm; earth pigments with gum arabic and rabbit skin glue on canvas) © p ward 2015

crow point triptych (3x60x50cm; earth pigments with gum arabic and rabbit skin glue on canvas) © f owen & p ward 2015crow point triptych (3x60x50cm; earth pigments with gum arabic and rabbit skin glue on canvas) © f owen & p ward 2015

The different natural binders (gum arabic, rabbit skin glue and damar varnish), new range of colours and larger scale, and inspiration of working closely with another painter, has provided more depth, transparency, fluidity and subtlety in mark-making within my painting and rejuvenated my desire for and understanding of its place within my life. Thank you Clare for your thorough investigation and generous sharing of your discoveries and materials. My own work has continued along its theme of resonance, energy and potential, hopefully offering space for healing and rejuvenation through personal observation and the local assimilation of process, materials and colour. The work is still intuitively aligned to a sense of landscape, connection and place, to nature’s processes and cycles, to magic and the power of intent, meditation and prayer.

bonk! (250x150cm; earth pigments with rabbit skin glue on canvas) © p ward 2015bonk! (250x150cm; earth pigments with rabbit skin glue on canvas) © p ward 2015

i do not love (it is) (78x78cm; earth pigments with gum arabic, damar varnish and rabbit skin glue on canvas) © p ward 2015i do not love (it is) (78x78cm; earth pigments with gum arabic, damar varnish and rabbit skin glue on canvas) © p ward 2015

indigo (90x70cm; earth pigments with gum arabic and rabbit skin glue on driftwood board) © p ward 2015indigo (90x70cm; earth pigments with gum arabic and rabbit skin glue on driftwood board) © p ward 2015

eARTh open studio © v large 2015eARTh open studio © v large 2015

The open studio events – Ilfracombe Art Trail 2015 and North Devon Art Trek 2015 – provided an opportunity for free community eARTh painting workshops, further contributions towards Francesca and I’s forthcoming painting together exhibition/project at White Moose Gallery in Barnstaple, and to meet a broad range of people – artists and non-artists alike. Ilfracombe Art Trail, a new and enthusiastically organized local community event including 40 artists in 25 venues throughout the town, brought nearly 150 people through eARTh’s doors in one weekend. While the more established Art Trek, spread across the whole of North Devon for 3 weeks, brought a far smaller number maybe indicating a natural trend towards the ‘local’ within the creative industries. Thank you to all who helped organize both events and to everyone who made time to visit us and contribute to the paintings. The Ilfracombe painting was initially shown at the Landmark Theatre in Ilfracombe before being hung along with a selection of other collaborative and communal works in Barnstaple – see next post.

full house – community painting at eARTh for ilfracombe art trail 2015 © eARTh 2015full house – community painting at eARTh for ilfracombe art trail 2015 © eARTh 2015

P Ward 2015


Crow Point 10415

“If you lack the materials to work with, go to the beach and draw with a stick in the sand, draw on the dry earth with a line of piss, make a drawing of the song of the birds in the emptiness of space, the noise of the water and of the wheel of a cart, and the song of the insects. All of this may be swept away by the wind and the water, but have the conviction that all these pure realizations of my spirit will influence, by magic and miracle, the spirit of other men.” Joan Miro, 1940

crow point © p ward 2015crow point © p ward 2015

Sometimes, when one’s creativity seems a little stifled or this art becomes a little too serious and responsibilities just too onerous to bare, it is enough to take oneself to the local beach, or a place of personal power, some woods or favourite walk, or even somewhere completely new, and just set to playing – exploring some different materials in a different environment, away from the studio with no pressure of outcome, finance or foe. Francesca and I are presently working together towards a number of exhibitions and open studios but often struggling with the demands of parenthood to find time to apply ourselves fully to our artistic endeavours. It was time for a change – a change in our expectations of ourselves, of our working practice both individually, and with each other, and maybe even a change in the form of our expression. Working together may often help such a process of re-evaluation and movement but it may just as easily hinder it. Whatever, it is always worth trying to get the juices flowing again, to unblock, to break the dam, to release and revive the mojo, so to speak.

Here’s what happened when we went to one of our favourite spots in North Devon – Crow Point, at the mouth of the Taw and Torridge rivers, where the rich estuarine waters flow into Barnstaple/Bideford Bay (wherever your more clandestine loyalties may lie), at the southern end of Braunton Burrows, centre of the UNESCO North Devon Biosphere Reserve, a place I had spent many happy childhood holiday times and one I will be continuing to share with our son Noah now and in the future.

arbritary transect © f owen & p ward 2015arbritary transect © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Transect – collecting objects that appeal from a line down the beach, recognizing arbitrary zones, changes in surface and ecology, bringing those things together as a simple expression of that system, process and place.

noah’s ark within arm’s reach © f owen & p ward 2015noah’s ark within arm’s reach © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Noah’s Ark at arm’s length – sitting and sorting the stones and sand to find as many seashells as one can within arm’s reach; drawing a line to mark that reach; placing all the shells together on a piece of rock or driftwood within the space; observing, perhaps identifying and counting and enjoying the diversity of life therein.

boardwalk for lizards and beetles © f owen & p ward 2015boardwalk for lizards and beetles © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Driftwood boardwalk for lizards and beetles – arranging a selection of sticks from one place to another.

crow point bundle © f owen & p ward 2015crow point bundle © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Flotsam and jetsam beach bundle – collect interesting things and tie them together in a bundle; photograph arrangement from a weird/artistic angle to capture a sense of moment and place.

rubbish sculpture © f owen & p ward 2015rubbish sculpture © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Rubbish sculpture, an ode to Mr Duchamp – a carefully juxtaposed re-appropriation of discarded toilet seat and plastic, sticks, rope, sand and shadows.

4 subtle stick crosses © f owen & p ward 20154 subtle stick crosses © f owen & p ward 2015

  • 4 subtle stick crosses on driftwood with sand – most transient darling!?

buggy tracks © p ward 2015buggy tracks © p ward 2015

line in the sand © f owen & p ward 2015line in the sand © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Line in the sand – drag a stick in the sand as you walk along the beach, enjoying this simple expression of movement and mark making.

crow point sketch © f owen & p ward 2015crow point sketch © f owen & p ward 2015

  • Pick things up and take them home – gather some more objects that particularly appeal to one’s artistic sensibilities at the time, tie them all together and cart them back to the car and consequently the studio where they may be arranged in pleasing and/or meaningful ways in the name of art…

As utterly committed contemporary (environmental) artists we, of course, spent time recording and documenting our ‘play’ for who knows just when our lighthearted, seemingly trivial investigative dalliances may trigger a new burst in creative output or inspired artistic flare and productivity. We also had a great time and hope that Noah did too!? From his shoulder-top vantage point who knows what he thought or what affects we may be catalyzing in his innocent and vulnerable being but from his smiling cheeky face chirruping away throughout the windy, sun filled walk, and the way he is chewing away on the table edge as I write this blog, I’m sure he’ll be just fine.

finger painting, earth pigments and natural binders on canvas © f owen & p ward 2015finger painting, earth pigments and natural binders on canvas © f owen & p ward 2015*

Thank you to Francesca and Noah for such a lovely walk, to Crow Point and North Devon in general for providing such creative and spiritual inspiration in abundance and such a beautiful place to bring up a small child, to this blog post for mainfesting yet another excuse to use one of my favourite quotes and to Mr Miro for writing it. We are now cracking back on with work in the studio in preparation to entertain and inspire you all again throughout the coming months and years…

© P Ward 2015

* and many thanks to Clare Thomas for priming the canvas with rabbit skin glue and linseed oil, and indeed for her inspiring residency at eARTh – I, for one, will be using more natural ingredients in my paint making from now on :-)

 


Morocco – Marrakech, Imlil, Essaouira

early spring 2015

It is difficult to concisely express the accumulated experience of 9 days (216 hours) in such a different culture and environment with a year old baby and loving partner. I was quietly determined to take only a few photos, to try to keep the experience more ‘whole’ through sensory memory alone. Of course, the phone camera was hard to resist and some moments were captured digitally both as sound and image, albeit rather inadequately, along with a handwritten list of bird and animal species. Suffice to say I also enjoyed some fantastic bundles of sticks, carried by people and animals alike, and a wonderful array of earth colours in the foothills of the High Atlas Mountains. But to sum up, the lingering sensation is that of movement, of change, of noise and smell and taste, of clamour, of conversations, of frustration, deliberation and joy, of meetings and departures, hellos and goodbyes, of a small boy waving and waving with a mouth full of berber bread and happy adoring faces, of colour, of heat, of wind and mountains and sea, of arid brightness and intensity, and then of a return to the soft, patchwork of rolling subdued earthy tones and a familiar English winter landscape from on high.

Here is a selection of the images taken by Francesca and myself (depending on who was holding the camera/baby at the time)…

bicycle-door-wall, marrakeck © f owen 2015bicycle-door-wall, marrakech © f owen 2015

dye smeared gateway, marrakeck tannery © f owen 2015dye smeared gateway, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015

rug showroom, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015rug showroom, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015

‘indigo’ scarf, marrakech wool dye shop © f owen 2015‘indigo’ scarf, marrakech wool dye shop © f owen 2015

bulbul; house bunting, marrakech © p ward 2015bulbul; house bunting, marrakech © p ward 2015

painted metal sheets, marrakech © p ward 2015painted metal sheets, marrakech © p ward 2015

rocks, tamatert, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015rocks, tamatert, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

sticks and blankets, aroumd, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015sticks and blankets, aroumd, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

firing the hammam, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015firing the hammam, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

painted path marker, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015painted path marker, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

boxes, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015boxes, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

graffiti, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015graffiti, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

stairwell, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015stairwell, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

fish cart, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015fish cart, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

palette, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015palette, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

rubbed-down hull, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015rubbed-down hull, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

earth juice stall, essaouira © f owen 2015earth juice stall, essaouira © f owen 2015

children’s mural project, essaouira © f owen 2015children’s mural project, essaouira © f owen 2015

old town, essaouira © f owen 2015old town, essaouira © f owen 2015

shops, essaouira © f owen & p ward 2015shops, essaouira © f owen & p ward 2015

evening promenade, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015evening promenade, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

riad beldy, essaouira © p ward 2015riad beldy, essaouira © p ward 2015

collection, morocco © p ward 2015collection, morocco © p ward 2015

home again, the south downs from the plane © p ward 2015home again, the south downs from the plane © p ward 2015

Many thanks to Francesca, Noah and all the people and creatures of Morocco who made our time so good.

© p ward 2015


 

1. http://karol-kochanowski.com/ – a lovely artist we met in marrakech

2. http://www.galeriedamgaard.com/ – a great gallery showing distinctive primitive local art in essaouira

3. http://francescaowen.wix.com/arts  – the wonderful francesca owen no less…


Karol 25215

.

I met a man in Marrakech from Manchester.

He was Polish.

He told me how the red-legged storks that reeled high above the Medina walls

Nested in his home town in Poland,

Migrating to spend their winters in Morocco.

 .

There was a certain poetry to his tale I felt

That made me smile.

.

I told him how the delicate Painted Lady Butterfly

Flew from Northern Africa and Spain

To southern England every year

To breed and to die.

memories of marrakech, earth pigments and gold powder paint on canvas © p ward 2015memories of marrakech, earth pigments and gold powder paint on canvas © p ward 2015

© p ward 2015


This morning I awoke to the sound of birdsong…

This morning I awoke to the sound of birdsong drifting through dawn-lit windows

The small, humble things in life offering sustenance in this big, big world

Spring hath sprung…

birdsong, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015birdsong, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015

“Curiously in amongst this plethora of Buddhism there was one token of Christianity – the autobiography of St Teresa of Lisieux. In spite of Tenzin Palmo’s antipathy to the Christian religion in general, she was drawn to the French saint who had entered a Carmelite nunnery when she was just fifteen and who had died at the age of twenty-four. She read her story several times and could quote from it at will.

‘The ironic thing is that the “little way” that she wrote about had nothing to do with the Way that I practiced. What I liked about her, however, was that she was very sensible. She sometimes slept through the church services and it did not worry her that she slept. God would have to accept her as she was! She never worried about her faults so long as her aspiration was right! She had this thing that she was like a small bird scratching around looking for seeds, glancing at the sun but not flying near it. She reasoned that she didn’t have to because the sun was shining even on a small being like a bird. Her whole attitude was very nice. She described herself as “a little flower” by the wayside which nobody sees but in its own self is very perfect as it is. And to me that is her primary message – that even in small, little ways we can be fulfilling our purpose and that in little things we can accomplish much.’[i]

bird, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015bird, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015

hare, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015hare, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015

bird, grass, egg, moon, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015bird, grass, egg, moon, compressed charcoal on paper © p ward 2015

(Drawings from recent experiments with compressed charcoal.)

© p ward 2015


[i] From Cave in the Snow by Vicki Mackenzie, the inspiring true story of how an English woman from the East in of London became a fully ordained Tibetan nun, spending 12 years in isolated meditation in a cave in the Himalayan foothills during the latter half of the 20th Century.


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