please accept my resignation 131016

 

some things I have seen, done and made that have made me think, feel and smile over the last few months…

“Reading true literature [Nan Shepherd] reflected, ‘it’s as though you are standing experiencing and suddenly the work is there, bursting out of its own ripeness . . . life has exploded, sticky and rich and smelling oh so good. And . . . that makes the ordinary world magical – that reverberates/illuminates.’ ” taken from Landmarks by Robert Macfarlane.

folded-paper-little-family-special-gifts-friendship-earth-pigments-on-canvas-p-ward-2016folded paper; little family; special gifts; friendship (earth pigments on canvas) © p ward 2016

wooden-tray-full-of-found-things-earth-2016wooden tray full of found things © eARTh 2016

the-exmoor-best-exmoor-zoological-gardens-p-ward-2016‘the exmoor beast’!?, exmoor zoological gardens © p ward 2016

crow-point-p-ward-2016crow point © p ward 2016

sycamore-p-ward-2016sycamore © p ward 2016

drawing-a-line-coast-to-coast-with-skedge-13916-earth-2016drawing a line, coast to coast with skedge 13916 © eARTh 2016

learning-to-draw-i-p-ward-2016learning to draw I © p ward 2016

learning-to-draw-ii-iii-iv-earth-2016learning to draw II, III, IV © eARTh 2016

towan-beach-roseland-peninsula-bottallack-mines-st-just-cornwall-p-ward-2016towan beach, roseland peninsula; bottallack mines, st just, cornwall © p ward 2016

west-somerset-railway-bicclescombe-park-shed-ilfracombe-earth-2016west somerset railway; bicclescombe park shed, ilfracombe © eARTh 2016

painted-palette-earth-pigments-on-wood-earth-2016painted palette (earth pigments on wood) © eARTh 2016

offcuts-in-an-offcut-frame-palette-mask-earth-pigments-on-wood-p-ward-2016offcuts in an offcut frame – palette; mask (earth pigments on wood) © p ward 2016

figure-offcuts-in-an-offcut-frame-viii-earth-pigments-on-wood-building-blocks-p-ward-2016figure; offcuts in an offcut frame – VIII (earth pigments on wood); building blocks © p ward 2016

resignation-definitiondefinition from google search

with special thanks to francesca, noah, agnes, family and friends for your love, support and companionship 🙂

© p ward/eARTh 2016


home: research, research and inspiration – early 2016 update

water, air and earth

sticks and stones

and, somewhere, fire

.

as the year unfolds

to a new life

within us

.

and you grow

and hold us rapt

in your emphatic personality

.

we deliberate upon Nature

each delicate

and deafening response

.

there is red and black and grey and green

dirt to some

riches to others

.

grinding away

what is left

to leave

.

more

and more

and more

.

we play

and learn

we play together

.

knees

teeth

home

.

home- county clare, Ireland © p ward 2016home: County Clare, Ireland © p ward 2016

The year began with family and friends in a rainswept County Clare, Ireland, my home for 10 years. Many of the places I wanted to revisit and share were beneath meters of water. Things, of course, had changed for better and worse but the spirit of the land still shone through.

home- lake vyrnwy, powys, wales © p ward 2106home: Lake Vyrnwy, Powys, Wales © p ward 2106

Then more mountains and lakes, family and friends, as my brother’s path shifts to the Welsh borders, an area I have not visited before but will visit again. This time snow, ice, fog and sunshine accompanied my journey. Lake Vyrnwy reservoir submerged a Welsh village to supply England with water.

home- Ilfracombe, winter 2016 © p ward 2016home: Ilfracombe, winter 2016 © p ward 2016

And at ‘home’ the winter lashes the coastline, reshaping and reforming. Ilfracombe was originally named after King Alfred and was gifted to two of his sons as a sheltered harbour on the western approaches to his kingdom. Before then an iron-age hill fort overlooked the natural harbour from, what is now, Hillsborough nature reserve. This part of the North Devon coast is formed predominantly from Devonian slates, sandstones and shales and boasts some of the highest sea cliffs in England. We have a new studio here that we hope will provide a base for our creative endeavours and space for others to enjoy.

home- Barnstaple Bay and Hele, North Devon © p ward 2016home: Barnstaple Bay and Hele, North Devon © p ward 2016

home- Holdstone Down, Combe Martin, North Devon © p ward 2016home: Holdstone Down, Combe Martin, North Devon © p ward 2016

let’s talk dirt! (White Moose Gallery, CCANW, Heritage Lottery Fund, Bideford Pottery, IGI Ltd, Roger Cockram)let’s talk dirt! (White Moose Gallery, CCANW, Heritage Lottery Fund, Bideford Pottery, IGI Ltd, Roger Cockram)

In May, as part of the CCANW Soil Culture project, I led a walk and talk with the White Moose Gallery and supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, to celebrate North Devon’s relationship with its earth resources. “Let’s Walk and Talk Dirt!” involved local potters, Harry Juniper and Roger Cockram, geologists Chris Cornford and Andrew Green, and soil scientist David Hogan to present some different perspectives about our local resources. Participants really enjoyed the interdisciplinary nature of the events but were frustrated by the lack of time to explore the subject matter in more depth. We are now working towards a ‘summer school’ to further explore North Devon’s potteries, pigments, rocks and soils.

Sidmouth, East Devon © p ward 2106Sidmouth, East Devon © p ward 2106

Jacob’s Ladder beach, Sidmouth, East Devon © p ward 2016Jacob’s Ladder beach, Sidmouth, East Devon © p ward 2016

The Thelma Hulbert Gallery, Honiton, East Devon invited me in May, to run painting with earth workshops to accompany their ongoing Soil Culture exhibitions. The first workshop introduced the ideas to a small group of partially sighted children from the WESC Foundation, providing a space for us to enjoy the more than visual experience of the process and materials. I was also excited to be exploring a new area of the country, encouraging me to find new pigments and learn about their geology and history. The second workshop, for artists, included an invigorating morning field trip to Jacob’s Ladder beach in Sidmouth to gather small quantities of the iron-rich red and green mudstones, and whatever else took our fancy, followed by an afternoon of furious experimentation grinding and binding a selection of pigments with a variety of mediums. It was great to meet some new faces in such a lively and friendly gallery.

home- Wessex – Branscombe beach, East Devon, Hardy country (chalk and flint) © p ward 2016home: Wessex – Branscombe beach, East Devon; Hardy country (chalk and flint) © p ward 2016

Something that did surprise me was the presence of chalk in the landscape of East Devon. Having been raised in Portsmouth I am familiar with the chalk and flint of the South Downs and Isle of Wight but wasn’t aware of it so far west along the coast. The sedimentary Cretaceous beds at Beer, that I saw from Branscombe beach during a day of research, lie above Upper Greensand that then rests on the more familiar Mercian Triassic red mudstones of South Devon. Apparently there is an ‘unconformity’ here in that the interceding Jurassic layer is missing, the area being land during that era. The nodules of flint and chert present in the Chalk and Upper Greensand that make up the beaches are also apparent in the local architecture creating further similarities to the South Downs and other Chalk areas across Europe.

One such region, that I also feel an affinity with through my ancestry and boyhood cycling adventures, is the Wessex Downs. The ancient country of Wessex encompassed Hampshire, west to the Cornish borders, and Wiltshire, Dorset, Devon and Somerset. In more recent times its character and characters have formed the backdrop for the literary works of Thomas Hardy. I was recently contacted by a research fellow from Exeter University to collaborate in a project to explore the value to health and well being of arts-based environmental workshops. His previous research looked at the work of Thomas Hardy in relation to the Wessex landscape. We are now waiting to see if our initial funding application has been successful before embarking on a major AHRC project around a similar theme. It has been fascinating working with a complete stranger towards a shared goal.

Hele community group sculpture proposal sketches © eARTh 2016Hele community group sculpture proposal sketches © eARTh 2016

Meanwhile, closer to home again we have been working with the local community towards re-landscaping an unsightly patch of ground behind the bus shelter in our village. It was good to be invited, to meet some more of our neighbours, to learn about the history of the village and to think how to we might alter such a space to celebrate the area. It was recently discovered that the area is owned (rather than it being public space) which has put the project back somewhat!?

sketches in wood and stone © p ward 2016sketches in wood and stone © p ward 2016

And back in the studio I have been enjoying putting together some new work (see previous post) using old offcuts of wood, old pots of paint and some new pigments. After 9 months I finally feel like I am settling in, enjoying the space and making something new, as well as finding time for my other interests and beautiful family. With a new arrival imminent we’ll be working hard to keep it up…

jacob’s ladder, earth pigments on canvas © p ward 2016jacob’s ladder, earth pigments on canvas © p ward 2016

corn mill close, masonry paint on painted board © p ward 2016corn mill close, masonry paint on painted board © p ward 2016

offcuts – sketch in wood © p ward 2016offcuts – sketch in wood © p ward 2016

© P Ward 2016


valentine

valentines card 2016valentine (coloured pencil on folded paper) © p ward 2016

.

with all the love

in the world

our future yet to unfurl

the clouds above

revealing beauty

.

for Francesca 14216

.

© p ward 2016


Saying hello to the Faeries…

One week on the Isle of Man, 2015

It is nearly thirty years since I last visited Ellan Vannin – the Manx name for the Isle of Man. Situated in the middle of the emerald waters of the Irish Sea, within sight of England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Heaven, so it is said, this self-governed commonwealth nation is probably best known for the yearly motorcycle TT race. For me, as an idealistic teenager surrounded by radical older students, it became a place of great significance in my own spiritual development. For the Celts it was the centre of the Faerie Empire, the royal thrones sitting atop the second highest mountain, South Barrule. Even today, respect for the other realms is still very much in evidence. Beyond this the island, once you have accepted the proliferation of lycra-clad outdoor pursuits, the squeals of cliff-leaping coasteerers and the constant stream of motorcyclists, is still a peaceful haven with stunning views and coastline, a place of folklore, local heritage and marine and avian wildlife.

manx dog by unknown artist, fired clay; carpets; crushed quartz pebbledash, Port Erin © p ward 2015Manx dog by unknown artist, fired clay; carpets; crushed quartz pebbledash, Port Erin © p ward 2015

Port Erin garden I-IV © p ward 2015Port Erin garden I-IV © p ward 2015

malachite and sea glass, Port Erin © p ward 2015malachite and sea glass, Port Erin © p ward 2015

found stick figure, Silverdale Glen © p ward 2015found stick figure, Silverdale Glen © p ward 2015

Mull Tomb Circle; Lochtan sheep; Manx thatch, Cregneash © p ward and f owen 2015Mull Tomb Circle; Lochtan sheep; Manx thatch, Cregneash © p ward and f owen 2015

The Chasms I-III, Port St Mary © p ward 2015The Chasms I-III, Port St Mary © p ward 2015

The Sugarloaf; Spanish Head, Port St Mary © p ward 2015The Sugarloaf; Spanish Head, Port St Mary © p ward 2015

Ramsey I-III © p ward 2015Ramsey I-III © p ward 2015

standing stones, Ramsey © p ward 2015standing stones, Ramsey © p ward 2015
discarded herrings, Peel; discarded scallop shells; bracken, Fleshwick © p ward 2015discarded herrings, Peel; discarded scallop shells; bracken, Fleshwick © p ward 2015

full moon, Port Erin © p ward 2015full moon, Port Erin © p ward 2015

from South Barrule © f owen 2015from South Barrule © f owen 2015

heather bundle, South Barrule © p ward 2015heather bundle, South Barrule © p ward 2015

from Bradda Head I-II © p ward 2015from Bradda Head I-II © p ward 2015

from Bradda Head III © p ward 2015from Bradda Head III © p ward 2015

Thank you to my family for treating us to this short holiday and this time to restore my connection to those things that inspire my living.

special people, IOM © p ward 2015special people, IOM © p ward 2015

© P Ward 2015


Morocco – Marrakech, Imlil, Essaouira

early spring 2015

It is difficult to concisely express the accumulated experience of 9 days (216 hours) in such a different culture and environment with a year old baby and loving partner. I was quietly determined to take only a few photos, to try to keep the experience more ‘whole’ through sensory memory alone. Of course, the phone camera was hard to resist and some moments were captured digitally both as sound and image, albeit rather inadequately, along with a handwritten list of bird and animal species. Suffice to say I also enjoyed some fantastic bundles of sticks, carried by people and animals alike, and a wonderful array of earth colours in the foothills of the High Atlas Mountains. But to sum up, the lingering sensation is that of movement, of change, of noise and smell and taste, of clamour, of conversations, of frustration, deliberation and joy, of meetings and departures, hellos and goodbyes, of a small boy waving and waving with a mouth full of berber bread and happy adoring faces, of colour, of heat, of wind and mountains and sea, of arid brightness and intensity, and then of a return to the soft, patchwork of rolling subdued earthy tones and a familiar English winter landscape from on high.

Here is a selection of the images taken by Francesca and myself (depending on who was holding the camera/baby at the time)…

bicycle-door-wall, marrakeck © f owen 2015bicycle-door-wall, marrakech © f owen 2015

dye smeared gateway, marrakeck tannery © f owen 2015dye smeared gateway, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015

rug showroom, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015rug showroom, marrakech tannery © f owen 2015

‘indigo’ scarf, marrakech wool dye shop © f owen 2015‘indigo’ scarf, marrakech wool dye shop © f owen 2015

bulbul; house bunting, marrakech © p ward 2015bulbul; house bunting, marrakech © p ward 2015

painted metal sheets, marrakech © p ward 2015painted metal sheets, marrakech © p ward 2015

rocks, tamatert, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015rocks, tamatert, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

sticks and blankets, aroumd, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015sticks and blankets, aroumd, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

firing the hammam, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015firing the hammam, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

painted path marker, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015painted path marker, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

boxes, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015boxes, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

graffiti, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015graffiti, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

stairwell, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015stairwell, imlil, high atlas mountains © p ward 2015

fish cart, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015fish cart, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

palette, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015palette, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

rubbed-down hull, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015rubbed-down hull, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

earth juice stall, essaouira © f owen 2015earth juice stall, essaouira © f owen 2015

children’s mural project, essaouira © f owen 2015children’s mural project, essaouira © f owen 2015

old town, essaouira © f owen 2015old town, essaouira © f owen 2015

shops, essaouira © f owen & p ward 2015shops, essaouira © f owen & p ward 2015

evening promenade, essaouira © p ward:f owen 2015evening promenade, essaouira © p ward/f owen 2015

riad beldy, essaouira © p ward 2015riad beldy, essaouira © p ward 2015

collection, morocco © p ward 2015collection, morocco © p ward 2015

home again, the south downs from the plane © p ward 2015home again, the south downs from the plane © p ward 2015

Many thanks to Francesca, Noah and all the people and creatures of Morocco who made our time so good.

© p ward 2015


 

1. http://karol-kochanowski.com/ – a lovely artist we met in marrakech

2. http://www.galeriedamgaard.com/ – a great gallery showing distinctive primitive local art in essaouira

3. http://francescaowen.wix.com/arts  – the wonderful francesca owen no less…


Karol 25215

.

I met a man in Marrakech from Manchester.

He was Polish.

He told me how the red-legged storks that reeled high above the Medina walls

Nested in his home town in Poland,

Migrating to spend their winters in Morocco.

 .

There was a certain poetry to his tale I felt

That made me smile.

.

I told him how the delicate Painted Lady Butterfly

Flew from Northern Africa and Spain

To southern England every year

To breed and to die.

memories of marrakech, earth pigments and gold powder paint on canvas © p ward 2015memories of marrakech, earth pigments and gold powder paint on canvas © p ward 2015

© p ward 2015


Winter Butterfly 171214

Today I let a Peacock butterfly out of the window of my house. It is mid December but the weather is mild.

We have a number of butterflies – mainly Small Tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae) and Peacock (Aglais io) – who appear to hibernate in our house. When the weather is mild they wake up. I am never sure whether to let them out or not. Would staying in the house mean further hibernation or slow starvation as they flap helplessly against the windowpane? Letting them out into the changing weather can only mean certain death as their life force is drained by the cold and lack of nutrients from their natural food sources.

From childhood I was taught that a butterfly’s life lasts but one day, as it emerges from its chrysalis with shimmering wings, drinking briefly from its chosen flowery nectar, choosing a mate and exhausting itself in procreative fervour. This seems not so or at least not entirely accurate. I have read that the Painted Lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui) reaches British shores after a migratory flight from northern Africa and Spain, while obviously the Peacock and Small Tortoiseshell often spend a winter, at least, in dry dark sheltered roof spaces and cupboards before embarking on life once more.

As this butterfly flew out into the dim blustery day I wonder on how much more misinformation I have been fed during my formative years, and if this brief liberation, caused by my own puzzled intervention, was truly for the best…

threshold, digital images from drawings and paintings © p ward 2014threshold, digital images from drawings and paintings © p ward 2014

© P Ward 2014